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Hey guys, sorry for the lack of video review this week, I’ve lost my voice and I don’t want to put off these reviews’ for another week.

Crusty Bigglebones

Author: Lord TophCrusty bigglebones cover

I’m not sure what Crusty Bigglebones actually is, I know it’s a picture book (although when I picked it up I didn’t, but then that is the fault of Reading Deals, as they only give a short paragraphs worth of info, I thought I was getting a short story about an oddball who couldn’t fit in, instead I got a picture book), but I don’t mean what type of book, I mean the point of the story.

Short stories, to me at any rate, are supposed to be funny little romps, have enjoyable pictures or teach a moral lesson otherwise I don’t see the point of them so much.

I couldn’t see a moral lesson in Crusty though, I mean maybe that washing is a good idea? Because Crusty starts off unwashed and unsuccessful, but his success and cleanliness seem to happen at the same time so maybe that’s it?

So how about the pictures? You can either call them heavily stylized or not very good, depending on how eloquently you like to critique things. Personally, I can’t say I enjoyed them, with reasonably flat compositions and a very squiggly style. I can’t speak for the paperback version since I had a black and white kindle version to work with but I’m not sure how much colour would have improved things.

And finally is it fun? It was … fine, sometimes it rhymed and sometimes it didn’t, so I’m not sure what was going on there. There was no silliness or general humour that can make picture books like that great, it was just statements about Crusty being a stinky boy and then not being a stinky boy anymore.

I read the whole thing in a matter of minutes, and while I didn’t hate it I probably would if I paid for the experience, especially with the book costing nearly seven pounds!

Cathood: How To Be The Perfect Cat

Author: Rosie MalezerCathood cover

But onto the second work I’m going to review today, Cathood: How to be a Perfect Cat, which will be of the writing only, since the copy I was gifted was without Illustrations.

However even without them I still enjoyed the book. As a pet owner myself, a lot of the jokes rang true and I found myself chuckling quite a bit. My favourite ‘blog post’ was the one about dogs, with their constant creepy smiling, food stealing and perplexing butt waggles. If you have a cat, you’ll probably have even more to amuse you with the antic’s Muffin (the name assigned by her human much to Muffin’s displeasure) gets up to.

While some chapters were certainly stronger than some others, for example I didn’t really feel the blog post on changing cat food really added much, whereas I really liked Muffins observations on the communications of her deaf owner, all of them are short and snappy with Muffin’s unique outlook on the human she ‘owns’ so I didn’t find myself disliking any of them. If I had to come up with a criticism it’s that I wish there had been a few more of them, maybe covering more about the outside or Muffins thoughts on some day to day ins and outs.

Not quite perfect but it’s a simple yet enjoyable little book that I would be reading to my five-year-old+ right now if I had one (God forbid), and I would happily totter through myself again on any lazy Sunday.